Sea Sluggin’ it out

imageimageSo I’ve been obsessed with Sea Slugs, Hares, and various Nudibranches lately. They are beautiful creatures, and come in many varieties.

 

A few weeks ago, I talked a little about Sea Hares, and I mentioned the Sea Slug Forum. This is a really cool site, and I’ve been learning a lot from it. They are related to snails, but their shell has pretty much disappeared into a thin shell plate on the inside. I’ve snagged a few neato diagrams from the site to show how the Sea Hare folds over the shell “remnant”.

Essentially, a lot of them look like a little folded taco with antennae if you’ve been looking at them too long. I thought this might be a crazy project with a bit of leftover polymer clay. So, I had a bit of fun.

I got all my polymer clay stuff together, like my silicone mats, blades, texture tools, and even some antibacterial gel (gets the polymer clay color right off your hands and cleans everything up!).

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Next, I rolled out some wild, swirled clay I had leftover, and flattened it to about 1/4″ thick or less. I cut these into little squares with the corners cutoff.

Like I said before, they’re little tacos, so I’m going to make them that way by choosing a couple of squares with a nice pattern, and folding them into hollow tacos. We don’t want to put additional polymer clay inside, because that will take forever to bake all the way through, and you’ll probably burn the outside.

To give my Sea Hares a little cred, I used a ball point tool to create little undulations, making little parapodia. I added antennae (kind of creative license on that one), and added spots with other color polymer clay dots.

Finally, since I thought these would be fun as earrings, I poked a hole in the top of their foot….

I made made an even bigger version with some more scrap clay I had.

This was a mix of FIMO Soft and Sculpey Primo, so I baked these at 220 F for an hour, and that was probably a bit much.

I let these cool, and got out my paint pens to put some detail on the critters. I painted more dots, outlined them, added eyes, etc. Then I sealed each piece with sealant glaze in glossy. I used Sculpey’s Glaze.

When I was finished painting and sealing,  I needed to add jump rings and earring hooks to each of the little sea slugs using jewelry pliers.

Sea slug of my dreams…..image

DIY Costa Rica Style Surfer Bracelet

I grew up in Kentucky, so growing up in the surfing and beach lifestyle is something I’ll never understand. I still giggle at the “dude”, “brah”, “Yewwwww!”, and myriad other lingo thrown around. On top of that, you must know the correct things to wear, in and out of the water, the latest hot surfers on tour, AND where the best local sandbars are located during the full moon at high tide.
Yay! Surfing is fun! No wonder people find it a touch intimidating.

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Oh, ROXY, you make it look so easy…

I remember learning to surf in a bikini, like all the ROXY ads showed. Quickly, I started to put it together that surfing in bikinis only work if you are:

  • An experienced longboarder,
  • Skinny,
  • Surf tiny, sloping waves, OR
  • Have glue in your suntan lotion

Since at this point- being middle aged- I no longer sport a bikini, but it’s fun to be trendy sometimes to the surfiness. Even if it’s only for the Summer.

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I like the Pura Vida (meaning literally “Pure Life” in Spanish, but translates into more of a life concept) bracelets, which are popular with a lot of surfers. Duuuuuude. Their business model is that they provide jobs for Costa Ricans, and they also have charity bracelets that give a portion of sales to various groups, like Save the Orcas, Autism Awareness, and so on.
Most of their standard bracelets run $5.00 each. They’re made from a few strands of Linhasita cord (high quality waxed cord NOT in your standard craft store, but affordable). They also have a tiny charm. That’s a HUGE profit margin.
Please someone correct me, but as I’m aware, the company was started by ex-pats to employ Costa Ricans, but it is STILL a business first. The charity funds they disclose on their website total less than a million dollars. They’ve sold A LOT of five dollar bracelets. I have three- I’m kind of peeved that after more than 10 years no more than that has been donated to charity.
Then I remembered- the best way to give to charity is to give your time and money directly, not purchase stuff in the hope the business passes it along. The businesses end up looking like heroes, and you don’t really know where your money went.
Ok, I said all that to say this:
So you can free up real money to give to charity, here’s a much cheaper version of some surf cred for ya.
It took me a while to figure out that the company uses a special type of waxed cord called Linhasita. It holds up in water far better than hemp or regular waxed cotton, plus is EXTREMELY colorfast. It’s not very expensive, but I’ve never seen it at a chain craft store.
When I first ordered some, I got it from Etsy, but since it came from Guatemala it took three weeks and my cord was all tangled up from customs rifling through the package in transit. THAT’S why it was free shipping…..
Since then, I’ve ordered from Amazon, but I always check to make sure it says “Linhasita” cord. There’s also direct through their website, linhasita.com.
I studied my Pura Vida bracelets to see how they are constructed, and added my own spin.

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First, I wanted to incorporate a cowrie shell into the bracelet, and I had one that was cut so it had a flat back so it would lay flat against the wrist. I used several complimentary colors for the cord.
I measured out about 16 inches of cord, making 4 total lengths of cord. I cut the length in half, then took each half and folded those in half. I pinned these to my foam macrame board to make sure I had the lengths even.

 


Next, I looped one of the folded cord lengths from the back to the front of the cowrie shell, and did a lark’s head over to one side. I did this to the other side as well.

 


Next, I pinned the shell to the board, measured down one side about two inches down, and tied a square knot at that point. I did this on the other side.


I cut the green cord ends past the square knot and burned the end with a lighter, smashing the ends down into a little flattened end where the square knot doesn’t slip off. GO OUTSIDE to burn the cord if you do this. It’s smelly and bad for you to sniff. Duh.
I did this on both ends.

I pinned the bracelet back onto the foam board. I took the two cords used to square knot an end, and started twisting both in the same direction as the twist direction it’s already going in. Remember doing that with a string and a pencil during English class? Then the string wrapped back onto itself twisting the other way? That’s what I did. I twisted the two cords really tightly on their own, then by twisting them together in the opposite direction locks the cords. In spinning, this is called plying. A yarn can be 1 ply, 2 ply, and so on. I slipped a little seahorse charm onto one of the cords before plying it.

imageOf course, I did this to the other side, overlapped these cords, and made a few square knots to make a sliding knot closure like the other bracelets use. I used a short length of purple, then singed the ends off with my Thread Zap tool (outside!).

Here’s a side-by-side of my Pura Vida bracelets on the left, with the new one I made on the right.

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Originals on the left, my version on the right.

Here’s the same bracelet in fashion shoot mode….

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“So yeah, so bro, my gnar airs are improving after wearing this magic shell. I think it has, like, ocean powers and stuff. I think it keeps sharks away too, ya know?”

DIY Shark Repellent Band (*Results May Vary)

It’s amazing how many surf gadgets and gimmicks have come and gone. And I’ll be the first to admit I totally have given in to the sales pitch from time to time. The Turbo Tunnel fin with the hole in it, the Wax Grater, the bottled “Special Surf Wax Remover” from Ron Jon’s…..Guilty.

The latest one making the circuit is SharkBanz, which is based on an idea that was shown on a video during Shark Week several years ago. I thought the people in the video were aiming to sell some type of anti-shark cage, they put a briefcase-sized piece of neodymium into a small tank and baited a couple of sharks in crystal clear water. The sharks did turn away, but they had to get CLOSE. With A LOT of magnet.

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SharkBanz. Not for timekeeping.

 

Discovery Channel Video Showing Sharks and Magnets

So, essentially, the SharkyBands idea is if you pick up some of those neodymium magnets from the craft store or the hardware store, encase them in some silicone, you can charge $65.00. That’s it.

The problem is that 5, 10, 40 SharkBanz aren’t enough to deter a hungry shark. If YOU hadn’t eaten in two days, and someone barely pinched YOU while you were reaching for that last piece of Meat Lovers’, would it stop you? Didn’t think so.

But, if you need piece of mind, here you go. For a heck of a lot less.

imageI picked up a package of neodymium magnets, some 1/4″ ID clear flexible tubing from the hardware store,  and I already had a bit o’ leftover caulk from a bathtub recaulk recently.

So, I put the magnets in the tube sleeve, and sealed each end with a dab of caulk, so no water can intrude into where the batteries are.

 

 

Next, to make something that would be stretchy, waterproof, and could be attached to the magnet securely, I looked to my fad collection of those silly Rainbow Loom rubber band loom things. Confession day. Sad.

imageSince this is silly and stupid from the get-go, I’ll add a layer of crazy. I think it was around that same year that somebody found that sharks are fearful of poisonous sea snakes. That’s like the elephant and the mouse. So, the next gimmick was black and white striped wetsuits, surfboard stickers to cover the bottom your board, blah blah blah. So, I’ll use black and white rubber bands for this project to make snakey-poo.

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Ooooooh. Sooooo scared. Not.

I did a 5 pin fishtail on the Monster Tail loom (they’re cheap right now since the fad is kind of over- you could probably score one off a teenager in the family, or at a Goodwill. I used 8 white rubber bands, alternating with 6 black rubber bands. I made a imagelength of about 10-11 inches to go around my ankle.

Since this design is like a tube, I can insert the little sealed case of magnets inside, like  the “head” of the snake towards the end of the ankle bracelet.

I did a few more rubber bands to encase the magnets, then finished off the end, and attached it to the other end using one of those plastic loops that come with the bands.

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“It looks so….real…ly creative.”

Time to test!

*****************

I went out, about 7:45 AM at the notorious Cocoa Beach Pier, at a spot that had a imageparticularly active bait ball of fish popping up like water fireworks. Yay! Maybe there’s something out there. I am wearing my shark covered swimsuit, and I painted my toenails a nice metallic green. The anklet held up just fine for about 2 hours of surfing little waves, and even with a lot of fish movement around me, I didn’t even get imagebumped. Well, can I sell these now? It’s not EXACTLY like the other guy’s, it’s just more stupid. One data point should be ok. As long as you haven’t gotten attacked, it’s 100% effective. Was this on Shark Tank? Please tell me Mark Cuban laughed at this.

I was more interested in whether or not the caulk held up and kept the magnets dry, so I cut the anklet open, and gave it a good inspection. I only let the caulk cure for 24 hours, and it held ok.

Woo Hoo!

The truth is, there’s sharks in the ocean. At least you hope there’s still some.

 

Deluxe Beach Changing Towel with Hood

Flashback Post!

Originally posted on Friday, March 18th, 2016.

Even though I’ve made a simple one of these beach cover-ups before, I wanted something a bit more substantial. I also wanted one that was a bit wider for getting into and out of my wetsuits easier. Wider. Yikes. I also wanted to put a hood on this one in case the wind is howling in the parking lot when I get out.
So, I procured a couple of big beach towels from the local outlet store. Outlet stores are the best for good towels- they’re as cheap as Walmart, but last longer since they’re made for a department store. Just don’t get picky about what color/print/etc. For the hood, I went to the clearance bin and found a single hand towel with a funky fiesta print.


For this project, instead of sewing down each long side (which is over 5 feet long), I’m going to make the side seams the short edges of the towel. 32 inches will be plenty

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Tagless, like Jordan’s undies

long enough to cover me, but not so long that it will be difficult to change with.
First thing, I cut off any tags on the towel- I don’t want to take the chance and sew over the extra bulk.

Nautica doesn’t make these cover ups!
Next, I pinned (technically clipped) one of the long sides together with the LOOPY SIDE OF EACH TOWEL FACING OUT, and the groomed, soft sides together,. This seems a little weird, but the loopy side is the most absorbent. The other long side will be the bottom opening of the cover up when we turn it inside out. I pinned/clipped all the way across, but the middle 12 inches I marked off on each side with a yellow butterfly pin to tell me not to sew this part. This section will be the head opening.

For my project, my middle twelve inch opening for my head started about 27 inches from the outer edge.
On a side note- if you are getting into sewing for surfing, I recommend going to your

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MORE?!? Yes, Please!

library and picking up Sandra Betzina’s More Fabric Savvy. It is a great reference for unusual fabrics, and since we’re not at a freakin’ quilting bee here, it’s VERY useful.
Also, please note that in the sewing pics below I was using a walking foot. A lot of people shy away from these, and I don’t know why. It takes about two seconds more to install than a regular presser foot, and, BOOM! huge difference in the feed of stuff like terrycloth, knits, neoprene, and other non-quilting-craft-cotton. Which leaves the fun stuff to sew. Try one!

So I used the finished edge on the towels as a seam guide. DO NOT try to sew or even fit this bulk of both finished edges under your machine! The needle WILL break, and you may do serious damage to the delicate machinery, or put an eye out, like Santa told you. I used a Heavy Universal needle (at least 90/14 or above) and set the machine for a straight stitch at 3.0 in length.

Remember to not sew all the way across, or you wont leave a head opening! Also, don’t try to sew the far edges together by machine. Either hand sew them together, or leave them as is, like I did. Don’t sew through that gnarly bulk! NOT worth it!

You don’t have to do this part, but I wanted those seam allowances sewn down. I went back and put a simple wide, long, zig-zag stitch down each allowance, stopping at my mark for my “headhole”. Remember, sew the part that’s towel, NOT the finished edge (the finished edge is light blue). Zig-zag down each side- as long as your thread matches, it won’t really show. When I did get to the head opening, I split off one side and turned a seam over that matched the allowance I had been sewing before the split.

Here, you can decide if you want to sew down each short side, leaving the top fold open down at least 12 inches for “sleeves”. Originally, I left mine open on the sides, but I liked it better sewn up the sides.
At this point, I was ready to add my hood. Of course, you will have wanted to have measured your hand towel to make sure this works. For me, the hand towel I bought eased just fine around the 12″ diameter neck. I folded the towel in half, the two pink bound edges together (loopy side OUT), pinning/clipping the top edge together. This top edge is what I’m going to sew, which will be the TOP of the hood.

I’m using the finished narrow edge as a seam guide when sewing.
Once that seam is finished, I pinned/clipped the bottom edge of the hand towel to the neckline of the big towel cover up. Make sure your seam will be on the INSIDE of the cover up once the hood is attached. Make sure you pin/clip A LOT, and SEW SLOWLY. It’s not a race. It’s probably flat out there, that’s why you’re reading this. No rush. Use a long stitch, and go back over it to secure. The bottom of the hood took up almost the entire neckline. Perfect!
Again, I don’t try to sew over the thick ends- leave them open, and save your machine. If the bound ends have enough of an opening, thread a LONG shoestring through them and you can pull the hood a little bit closed (not too much, depending on how thick the binding is). That’s it! With a hood, it’s easier to hang up to dry.

imageIf Star Wars was in an “Alternate Lifestyle” Universe, this is the Obi Wan special. NOT a man bun, thank you very much.

Upcycled Neoprene Chicago Screw Keychain

Wrong time of year for this project, I guess, but I collect scrap neoprene, mainly old wetsuits. So, these projects are year round fun for me, at least. I really like playing with neoprene- I don’t own an industrial sewing machine, so I’m limited on what I can sew, but there’s a lot of fun projects that you can make without needing anything exotic.

I do wash the scrap neoprene in the washing machine with detergent to cut out any “ewwww” factor. Usually, these suits are given to me, and have no life left for surf or dive use because of their condition. But, it’s a shame to throw out neoprene since it’s really not “recyclable”, and I don’t know of any programs that do so, except for Rip Curl’s wetsuit recycling program. So, washing in detergent isn’t a big deal, since if it breaks down the neoprene a little more, so what- it’s already shot!

Wetsuit kneepad

The old wetsuit’s kneepad

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The fob I’m going to DIY

I had cut up a men’s 3/2 full suit to use for repairs on another suit. This one had those heavy duty rubberized knee pads on it. I saved those, thinking there’s SOMETHING I could do with them, even if it was as a jar opener (it works, depending on the type of knee pad rubber). However, I saw a neato type of keychain advertised on Pinterest called a “Foldover Fob” that used a Chicago Screw and a simple strip of leather. It was nice because it keeps your keys from jingling in your pocket. The not-so-nice thing is that it cost 20 bucks, I think.

I thought this kneepad’s thick rubber reminded me of leather, so I thought to undertake this project with this material.

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Chicago screws and the contact person

Chicagoscrews.com was kind enough to send me an array of samples of these types of screws, and they’re quite amazing. If any local peeps would like to try this project too, let me know, I have extra screws. For this project, I used a 3/4″ stainless steel screw, but they manufacture them in plastic, aluminum, in colors, different lengths, etc.

Next, I wanted to allow for the longest keys I had, so I cut the long rectangular piece from the dead center of the kneepad, using my sharp rotary cutter and a good straight edge. You can see I made the strip about an inch in width.

I’ll clean up any imperfections later, or whatever. So, here’s the screw I’m going to use, 3/4″ long stainless steel, with an option to use a flathead or Philips screwdriver. The other side is polished blank.

I estimated about a quarter of an inch down from one end of the strip and cut two little slits with a sharp pair of scissors. Do this on the other end as well. You can use an awl or a strong punch if you have one, of course. This allows me to push the long end of the screw through one of the ends. I’m going to keep the rubbery side out.

Next, I loaded my keys on. This length fits about four average keys. Once you’ve loaded all your keys on, push the short end of the screw through the hole on the other end.

Get a screwdriver (even a coin works!) and screw it all together. Done!

imageThis keychain has been pretty handy. You can swing out the key you need from the fob, and I don’t feel like the college kegger Keymaster. I guess you can make something like this for those electric remote keys, but I drive a Mirthmobile with manual windows, so this is for the beach bum set, like me.

Hurricane Soap Recipe (Hot Water Surf Wax DIY)

It’s been so hot here in Central Florida, we’re probably going to get whacked with a hurricane once the Saharan dust storms settle down. A lot of meteorological happenins’. Yikes. Before I learned to surf, I thought surfers were hurriedly cleaning their boards on the beach before going out in the hurricane swell. Now I giggle when I think about wax as “Hurricane Soap” for your surfboard.

I’ve been told my mind only gets worse from here. Boo.

Even my “Tropical” surf wax has been melting off my board onto my arm while I’m in the water, it’s just that stinking hot. The air is about 95ish degrees F, and the water is around 88 degrees F, which is extremely warm, almost uncomfortable.

I lent my 6’10” to a friend for a while, so I’m riding my 7’6″ Town & Country Stu Sharpe fun shape. I love this board, not just because it was my first board, but it’s really fun on the right day. Luckily for me, we’ve had some fun waves this week, so I’ve been taking it out. The down side is that it has a pretty purple paint job with a gloss coat, which doesn’t help wax stay on the board very well when surfing the gates of hell. D’oh.

imageI thought back to my old post three years ago when I made my own wax. I remembered the beeswax being SUPER hard- much harder than even the “Tropical” store bought wax. I laid out all of the store bought wax I had on hand, from the “Cool” water (softest) to the “Tropical” (hardest). I had also heard a rumor that this DayGlo color wax is supposed to hold up to the Sun, so I was curious.

Like I said in the last post about wax, beeswax isn’t the cheapest thing in the world, so I figured I’d use a half-and-half recipe, so I’d have the benefits of the hardness of the beeswax, with some of the spreadability of the storebought wax. Like butter and margarine. But don’t eat it, or you’ll start grunting people off of waves and doing Florida hops on choppy mush. It’s a curse.

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All of the wax measured out

Recipe:

  • 1 Bar of Tropical Sticky Bumps Wax (they only make soy-based now, so it’s a bit softer than previous incarnations, IMHO)
  • Around 88 grams pure beeswax
  • Approximately 5 grams Day-Glo Sticky Bumps Wax (I only had it in warm, which is the only type available around here).

 

I have a dedicated double burner just for doing crafts with wax- DON’T reuse one you will eat from! It is very difficult to get wax residue off of everything, so, be a little anal retentive on this. Mine came from IKEA for $6, and if you can find one at your local thrift store, that’s ideal. I also keep an old knife to chop up the beeswax with, and I have some old wood chopsticks to stir with in my crafting kit. Just make sure not to get wax in your main pot of water under the double boiler- ONLY wax goes in the double boiler, NO water! The double boiler will rest just over the pot of boiling water. The smaller you can chop your wax up, the faster it will melt- the storebought stuff will melt faster than the beeswax.

Be patient and watch the process- I had some chunkage going, so I had to wait at least 15 minutes until most of the big beeswax chunks had started to shrink. I kept poking and stirring the wax mix with the wood chopstick the whole time. Melted wax can help speed up the heating of unheated chunks. It’s like making a fondue, just keep the crackers far away so you won’t get tempted.

Once all the wax has completely melted, and you’ve stirred the wax enough to homogenize the mixture, you can start pouring it into molds. Make sure you have enough extra molds available- you don’t want to throw out any overage. I used some more cheap IKEA silicone flexible ice cube trays like last time, this time I had starfish too!

Let the wax sit in the molds undisturbed for at least 45 minutes to allow them to set up and cool down. Don’t toss them in the freezer- I did that a long time ago, and it can create voids.

So, these aren’t huge bars of wax, but since beeswax is pricey, maybe I’ll try this as my  daily topcoat for a while, since I just put a nice base coat on the 7’6″ just last week. On a side note, if you’ve got kids who like to eat glue, they’ll love these, so keep them away from the children, mmmkay?

So here’s a look at the nose before and after waxing with the new wax. I really liked how it went on in the afternoon heat and the bumps built up really well.

The little bit of the neon yellow I added of the DayGlo wax barely made a dent in the color, so they’re a very light butter yellow, probably because of the beeswax more than the DayGlo coloring.

Maybe this year’s September Surf Expo theme will focus on the declining bee colony population, and how it will impact John John Florence’s shred-gnar ratio because the water’s too warm, and the wax has become too slippery to land triple nipple Ollie rail grabs, and the wax industry’s sold out, man. Deep.

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Our Beloved

What the hell do I know? Alls I know is a just need some tasty waves, and a few nugs of some decent wax, brah.

DIY Natural Surf Wax

One of my most popular posts on my old site! Enjoy!

Originally published by me on 15 March 2013 on Blogger.

I’ve kind of surprised myself I haven’t done this craft yet. Making natural (non paraffin/petro) wax is pretty simple, but honestly, the natural wax I’ve bought it the past has been really soft and not very good, so I’ve shied away from trying it myself.
After looking around on the internet for a recipe to try, I noticed a couple of things. First, the natural “organic” wax recipe is almost always comprised of two ingredients: beeswax and coconut oil. Secondly, the ratio is usually two parts beeswax, and one part coconut oil.
Now, I’m no expert, but coconut oil is kind of a runny semi solid. BUT, it’s cheaper in volume than beeswax, which can be quite expensive. This probably why I’ve gotten natural wax that’s so soft- too soft because the ratio was too low due to cost, which I can understand if you’re selling it.
In this case, I’m making it for my own use, so I wanted to make something that works imagefor me, and that would work better for warmer waters, like what’s here in Florida.
First off, I had to think ahead to how I wanted to measure out the 2 ingredients. Beeswax typically comes in a solid bar form. Coconut oil, of course, can be measured out in liquid teaspoon or tablespoon measurements. If I wanted to be able to measure out the beeswax in the same form, I would have to melt it down first, transfer it into a measurement cup, transfer any remainder to a heatproof container that would release the wax later, then transfer the wax from the measurement cup back to the double boiler that I’m melting it in. All this while, I’m hoping that the wax isn’t producing a skin, and that I’m transferring ALL of the wax from container to container to ensure reasonable accuracy.
Whew. What a pain.
Instead, why not use the density of beeswax to calculate the equivalent liquid measurement to the weight in grams, so I can weigh it out while it’s still solid? Better.
I used this website to reference the density of beeswax for my calculation to convert the solid equivalent to a liquid equivalent so I’d have “apples to apples”. I chose a much higher ratio to use for the recipe, and did the ratio as straight up liquid to liquid, not relative densities of the beeswax to coconut oil.
Bored.
Anywho, this is what I came up with for a goodly batch of wax:
     160 grams Beeswax
2 US tablespoons of Coconut Oil

Okay, so here’s the good part…..
I bought a 1 pound block of pure beeswax (I’m doing another project with beeswax, so I bought extra). Online, this cost me $14, but the shipping was free, and I’m going to use around half of it. You can also find beeswax in the candlemaking section of any craft or hobby store. Nope, it ain’t cheap. I also got a jar of coconut oil from the grocery store- I had to ask somebody where it was, it varies. You can also find this at the health food store. That cost about $5, but I’m only using two tablespoons of the jar.

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Using a food scale to measure out the beeswax

To measure out the wax, I used a serrated knife to cut off chunks and weigh them in a food scale.

Using a double boiler pan I got for cheap at Ikea (if I’d have waited, I probably could’ve gotten one at Goodwill), I used a large pot filled with boiling water underneath, and I melted the wax down. Don’t put any water in the upper pan with the wax! I really should have chopped the wax into smaller pieces to help the wax melt a bit faster.

To stir the wax, I used a wooden chopstick, and once the wax had completely melted, I was ready to add the coconut oil. I measured it with a tablespoon measuring spoon and put it directly into the pan.

I stirred just a bit more to ensure the mixture was even and was melted into each other. Then, it was ready to pour. For fun, I used a silicone fish ice cube tray (also an cheap Ikea score) and a couple of aluminum small tart tins.

After only about five minutes, the wax was getting pretty firm in the ice cube tray. The tart tins were taking a little longer.

Just to make sure, I let them set for a good 45 minutes, just to be overly safe. I think they harden up much quicker, really.

You can see that I got a couple of bars and a whole bunch of fish out of it. The fish shapes are actually pretty handy to handle when applying the wax.

I tested the wax on my board and it actually creates pretty good bumps, and works pretty well with some stick to it, much better than the other natural waxes I’ve used in the past. I think this ratio may be a winner. I still admit I like my traditional wax, but it’s kind of neat-o to make your own.
Now I feel compelled to munch on a bag of Goldfish crackers.