DIY Surfboard Carrier Sling

I think these surfboard carriers are pretty smart, but they can also get a bit over the top. I just need something to take some pressure off of my

Kinda pricey, but nice

 carrying arm when I’m taking my board down to the beach. More so now with my recent shoulder injury. There’s some on online stores that are well-designed, could probably take a bullet, but also cost some real cash (plus S&H, too).

I just figured I’d make my own simple one out of an ancient bath towel, a couple of surf tees, and a bit of rubber kitchen drawer grip ($1 for a big roll from the thrift store originally). Kinda has that MacGyver feel. Nice.

I LOVE this shirt, but it’s a little big

I did this one mostly for my 7’0” funshape, so this not-too-big, not-too-small shrunken bath towel would work fine. This towel’s width was around 1/3 of the length of my funshape board, which I thought would help for stabilization.

The only machine stitching I did on this carrier was to make the top casings for the handles. I just folded down each end a bit to the outside of the carrier, pinned it, and ran a straight line of stitching down each end. Also hid the fancy pants brocade strip so common with bath towels. Takes away from the Surf Cred, ya know.

If you want, you can add the kitchen drawer grip as a strip to the bottom of your carrier, like I did. I made mine 6” wide, and around 26ish” long, approximately the width of the carrier sling. This will help the board from sliding out of the sling as you move around. I used a heavy hand-sewing needle and Button and Craft thread (thicker than sewing machine thread) to sew in the strip to the bottom.

Next, I applied interfacing to the back of the surf tee logo to give it some stiffness for use as a pocket. I sewed the cut out patch pocket onto the front of the carrier, being careful not to overlap the kitchen grip attached at the bottom. I used a triple step zig-zag stitch around the curved edge. The top edge was open, but I had hemmed it already.

Taking the remainder from the surf tees to make the handles for the carrier sling using t-shirt yarn (learn how to make t-shirt yarn), I braided the strands, then sewed two braids together to give it some width. The t-shirt knit makes it comfortable on the shoulder, too, and also stretches a lot.

The handles were made by feeding 1/2 of my doubled braid into the casing I made on the towel, and sewing the ends together. Same for the other side.
Done!

I’m in full GNAR mode now

I was pleasantly surprised that it will carry my biggest longboard, my 9’0” Dewey Weber:

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Now that’s how you MacGyver, kids.

Yikes. World’s over.

Deluxe Beach Changing Towel with Hood

Flashback Post!

Originally posted on Friday, March 18th, 2016.

Even though I’ve made a simple one of these beach cover-ups before, I wanted something a bit more substantial. I also wanted one that was a bit wider for getting into and out of my wetsuits easier. Wider. Yikes. I also wanted to put a hood on this one in case the wind is howling in the parking lot when I get out.
So, I procured a couple of big beach towels from the local outlet store. Outlet stores are the best for good towels- they’re as cheap as Walmart, but last longer since they’re made for a department store. Just don’t get picky about what color/print/etc. For the hood, I went to the clearance bin and found a single hand towel with a funky fiesta print.


For this project, instead of sewing down each long side (which is over 5 feet long), I’m going to make the side seams the short edges of the towel. 32 inches will be plenty

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Tagless, like Jordan’s undies

long enough to cover me, but not so long that it will be difficult to change with.
First thing, I cut off any tags on the towel- I don’t want to take the chance and sew over the extra bulk.

Nautica doesn’t make these cover ups!
Next, I pinned (technically clipped) one of the long sides together with the LOOPY SIDE OF EACH TOWEL FACING OUT, and the groomed, soft sides together,. This seems a little weird, but the loopy side is the most absorbent. The other long side will be the bottom opening of the cover up when we turn it inside out. I pinned/clipped all the way across, but the middle 12 inches I marked off on each side with a yellow butterfly pin to tell me not to sew this part. This section will be the head opening.

For my project, my middle twelve inch opening for my head started about 27 inches from the outer edge.
On a side note- if you are getting into sewing for surfing, I recommend going to your

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MORE?!? Yes, Please!

library and picking up Sandra Betzina’s More Fabric Savvy. It is a great reference for unusual fabrics, and since we’re not at a freakin’ quilting bee here, it’s VERY useful.
Also, please note that in the sewing pics below I was using a walking foot. A lot of people shy away from these, and I don’t know why. It takes about two seconds more to install than a regular presser foot, and, BOOM! huge difference in the feed of stuff like terrycloth, knits, neoprene, and other non-quilting-craft-cotton. Which leaves the fun stuff to sew. Try one!

So I used the finished edge on the towels as a seam guide. DO NOT try to sew or even fit this bulk of both finished edges under your machine! The needle WILL break, and you may do serious damage to the delicate machinery, or put an eye out, like Santa told you. I used a Heavy Universal needle (at least 90/14 or above) and set the machine for a straight stitch at 3.0 in length.

Remember to not sew all the way across, or you wont leave a head opening! Also, don’t try to sew the far edges together by machine. Either hand sew them together, or leave them as is, like I did. Don’t sew through that gnarly bulk! NOT worth it!

You don’t have to do this part, but I wanted those seam allowances sewn down. I went back and put a simple wide, long, zig-zag stitch down each allowance, stopping at my mark for my “headhole”. Remember, sew the part that’s towel, NOT the finished edge (the finished edge is light blue). Zig-zag down each side- as long as your thread matches, it won’t really show. When I did get to the head opening, I split off one side and turned a seam over that matched the allowance I had been sewing before the split.

Here, you can decide if you want to sew down each short side, leaving the top fold open down at least 12 inches for “sleeves”. Originally, I left mine open on the sides, but I liked it better sewn up the sides.
At this point, I was ready to add my hood. Of course, you will have wanted to have measured your hand towel to make sure this works. For me, the hand towel I bought eased just fine around the 12″ diameter neck. I folded the towel in half, the two pink bound edges together (loopy side OUT), pinning/clipping the top edge together. This top edge is what I’m going to sew, which will be the TOP of the hood.

I’m using the finished narrow edge as a seam guide when sewing.
Once that seam is finished, I pinned/clipped the bottom edge of the hand towel to the neckline of the big towel cover up. Make sure your seam will be on the INSIDE of the cover up once the hood is attached. Make sure you pin/clip A LOT, and SEW SLOWLY. It’s not a race. It’s probably flat out there, that’s why you’re reading this. No rush. Use a long stitch, and go back over it to secure. The bottom of the hood took up almost the entire neckline. Perfect!
Again, I don’t try to sew over the thick ends- leave them open, and save your machine. If the bound ends have enough of an opening, thread a LONG shoestring through them and you can pull the hood a little bit closed (not too much, depending on how thick the binding is). That’s it! With a hood, it’s easier to hang up to dry.

imageIf Star Wars was in an “Alternate Lifestyle” Universe, this is the Obi Wan special. NOT a man bun, thank you very much.