Felt Fin Fun!

Like most crafters, I’m on Pinterest a lot, and not just for the hella dank memes. I’ve been clicking around some of the neato felt embroidery I’ve seen pinned lately, and decided to make a fun felt stuffie from a tracing of one of my longboard fins.

Certified DANK

Acrylic felt is pretty cheap, and if you can find the type made from recycled soda bottles, extra eco-hippie-surfer cred points for you. I also used basic embroidery thread and some poly stuffing. All can be found at any local craft store.

My supplies

Tracing the fin template

I went crazy cutting out shapes to sew on

Makin’ flowers

Adding in detail

Chain stitching the vines

I even added beads!

Blanket stitching the two sides together

I didn’t overstuff

I crocheted the edge and added a hang loop

Finished edge

Completed Stuffie!

So this is purely for fun, so I’m going to put it on the cool felt Lei I made for TikiMan a while back. It’s like a funky fresh headpiece:

Can you dig it???

I can see myself making a few of these little felt stuffies for kicks, especially in the afternoons since it’s been so freakin’ hot here. I mean, I did find an image on Pinterest that sums up Florida surfing perfectly…..

Do you think the wax is still good???

The Justin Quintal Loggerhead Classic

So this past Sunday, I watched the Inaugural Loggerhead Classic hosted by Justin Quintal and Vans in Jacksonville Beach, Florida.

The event consisted of invited pro competitors, hand selected by Justin Quintal and his brahs. 32 men and 16 women from up and down the East Coast were notified on rather short notice (~2 weeks?) to participate. Rumor is, the recent Vans Duct Tape Invitational in California went so well, the push to have an East Coast complement was inevitable.

The Sponsors’ Tents

Of course, the selected names (or missing names) could always be argued by astute East Coast surfing enthusiasts. However, the contest was very entertaining with small 1-2 foot semi-glassy conditions in the morning, becoming more wobbly in the afternoon. This allowed for some wild acrobatic moves on longboards, like hang fives, tens, hang heels, switch stance, etc.

First place honors for the Men’s Pro went to Pat Nichols, and Jazmine Dean for the Women’s Pro. They were well deserved wins in my opinion given the conditions, both completing many impressive maneuvers in their heats.

Friends of mine scoping out the action

Impressive

Really good surfers!

This event was promoted as a good natured effort to bring together “loggers” in a fun contest format, especially here on the East Coast. East Coasters, I believe, have the reputation of being less serious, less focused than Cali surfers sometimes. Perhaps this was an impetus to show some focus to the Surfin’ Neighbors. Perhaps it was to establish the Chosen Logger Clique, which creating a pecking order is never above groups of surfers. The $5000 prize purse sure didn’t hurt to lure out the big guns last minute.

But I’m sure they only came just for the East Coast Group Hug.

NO hugs, ONLY Yeets

The New Surfboard Bug

These days, I’m so happy with the boards I have, and I feel good about my collection currently. I could even trim it to this one only:

Starr 7’0” FunJun Quad + Single Fin

It’s my favorite all around board, but a while back, I had put a deep gash in it from ditching it under my friend’s board to avoid a worse collision on a wave. SO freakin glad neither of us were hurt, only the board. Big whoop.

This repair has been awesome

The repair’s been great, and I dig my paint job over the repair, but once I saw my local surf shop post a pic of this longboard with an acid splashed deck, I knew I wanted this look for the funshape I have now- much like a new dress, only slightly more resinous.

I love this acid splashed deck- I’m getting this with blue rails and bottom on my funshape

I will trade in the funshape I use now once my custom order is complete (hopefully soon!), so that will offset some of the cost, especially since this “look” requires extra paint on the rails and bottom (mine will be blue), gloss and polish on the resin. Honestly, this is not a need. However, hurricane season’s coming, and well, sometimes slipping into a new pair of shoes is nice to get you stoked.

Shoes are part of the Whole Game, Player.

Painting on Tagua Nuts

In my last post, I was carving some Tagua palm nuts to make some neato pieces. Like wood, Tagua nuts can be painted to artsy up a piece even more. I had cut a nice thick piece, and drilled a top hole to hang the slice as a pendant.

Sanded and ready to paint

For this project, I used my acrylic paint pens that I’ve used on my surfboards before. Small paintbrushes and toothpicks come in handy for detail painting too.

The brush on varnish I like to use with the acrylic paint pens I like

The important part is the varnish, though. Tagua is cellulose, so if you want your d’art to stay sharp and not bleed into the nut, put on a couple of thin coats on the surface before you start your creation. I sealed the entire slice before painting.

Once it’s completely dry, I can start painting whatever I want, building up color slowly.

Keeping just an accent

Happy little daisies

I made sure the acrylic paint was completely dry before painting two more thin coats of varnish to seal the piece.

I use my disposable contact lens containers for paint and varnish

I used some yellow Linhasita cord and some olivewood beads to finish this piece off into a necklace:

Happy and bright

Super easy, super fun, and if you hate what you painted, get out the sandpaper and start over. Hopefully the Tagua slice was cut thick enough.

I certainly got comfortable with sanding (not REALLY my arm, just a meme, haha!)….

Dude should’ve waxed before sanding

Tagua Nut Carving

I’ve always had a thing for palm trees, probably since they remind me of tropical places and surfy times.

It’s no surprise, then, that I freakin’ love Tagua nut anything, since it grows naturally from the Ivory Palm Tree.

Tagua was used in the old days like plastic would be used today: buttons, handles, knobs, jewelry, etc. were easily carved from this nut that resembles elephant ivory on the inside. So, after years of collecting various carved Tagua pieces, I had to try out carving some myself. Especially since non-biodegradable plastics seem to be forming islands in the ocean around us, it’s worth checking out for some hippie eco-fun.

I ordered some raw nuts from Etsy for about $1 each plus shipping, so it wasn’t a huge investment. Tagua nut harvesting is one of the few industries that encourages keeping rainforests around a little longer too….super hippie eco bonus.

One of the raw Tagua nuts I ordered

Tagua is supposed to cut similar to wood, so I used those type of tools for woodworking. I used tools like a scroll saw, sanding wheel, and drill bits that I already use for small wood craft projects:

My Dremel scroll saw

Since I didn’t want to saw my fingers off, using a vise was helpful- especially for cutting nice, even slices. You must either use a vise or glue the nut onto a steady block of wood to cut it. It’s just too small to try and line up under the saw with just your fingers….and keep ’em.

The hard rubber jaws of the vise are perfect for this work

Top view of the nut getting ready to be sawed in two

A nut slice…has a small void

Every Tagua nut potentially has a void at its’ center, which is something to consider when carving this. If the Tagua is dried properly during the harvest process, there is supposedly less of a void. So I’ve heard. This batch I received also looks a bit dark on the inside, so this Tagua might be older, but it’s still a beautiful color.

I made sure to cut and grind slowly, since Tagua burns very easily. And you can smell it when it starts to get too hot.

Sanding the exposed surface on the side wheel

Makin’ slices

I used a sanding bit to sand away the surface to make cool patterns

Tagua is delicate! I was too harsh with this piece

Some of the Dremel bits I played with

They polish up like little fancy bits o’ wood

Now, Tagua isn’t waterproof- it’s very porous cellulose, so it’s not a bad idea to coat pieces with a clear sealant. I like the paint-on varnishes better than the spray can type for these. When I tried using the spray can, the varnish left tiny little raised dots all over the surface. Bleh.

Here’s some of my sealed pieces using the better paint-on varnish:

Finished and varnished pieces

Since I already enjoy woodworking, I can totally see myself getting into this tropical craft that’s fun, sustainable, and reminds me of my favorite trees ever….

Christmas lights should be banned in Florida because it’s absurd

DIY 4Ocean Charm Earrings

Remember that necklace/wrap bracelet I made a couple of posts ago? I saved the little silver charms from the 4Ocean bracelets, and I wanted to use them to make some easy fun earrings with basic stuff from the craft store. Ear hooks, a few glass beads, and a couple of eye pins can make a fancy looking pair of earrings. You’ll also need a pair of small round-nose jewelry making pliers (here’s a link to some I found online).

All of my supplies

Adding a charm to the end of each eye pin

Sliding a silver bead, a glass fish bead, then a silver bead onto each eye pin

Preparing to make a loop at the top of each eye pin

I try to match up the same position when I make the loop on each

Done!

Ear selfie

These are a cute way to promote the 4Ocean cause of removing plastics from the ocean, and creating awareness of plastic pollution.

Honestly, though, for surfing the Cocoa Beach Pier, I need more useful earrings. I searched on Etsy and found my dream pair:

OFF MY WAVE WANKER

DIY Surfer Girl Necklace or Wrist Wrap

Sometimes people think of crochet as only hats, scarves, and shawls. Yawn. There’s always fun stuff to make with crochet that doesn’t have to turn out fuzzy and hot, it can even come out beachy and summery.

Bowling a perfect strike

That’s good for here in Central Florida, since it’s already getting up into the 90’s. Hurricanes, anyone?

I used my favorite macrame thread in the world- Linhasita– which is essentially nice waxed nylon cord for this project. I also prestrung all of the beads I wanted to use onto the spool of thread. I used these cool wooden beads from Hawaii (no, someone brought them to me from there- boo…) and various glass E beads, but I needed to decide on my pattern BEFORE beginning to crochet with the beads.

My supplies

Using a 2.5 mm crochet hook, I made a chain of 6 tight chain stitches, strung on a wood bead or group of glass beads, made a loop around them, then repeated the pattern for all the beads.

Chain 6, add some beads. Cooler than a scarf

I ended the necklace with a small loop tied off and melted and sealed using a lighter (outside!) since this is waxed nylon. The other end is a blue recycled glass button as a toggle, so it can also be worn as a wrap bracelet. It makes nice beach wear, since the wood beads are light, and the crochet loops make a lightweight cord.

The blue glass disk is the toggle closure

This is something boho-hippie stylin’ and fun to make using the most fundamental of crochet stitches. And it’s wearable when it’s 100 degrees outside.

Hey, I could have shown you how to crochet something else Ocean themed that’s a lot worse…