Upcycled Surf Scrunchie

Yes, I’m guilty of STILL liking the idea of scrunchies. Fortunately, it’s a trend right now. Good- I could really use a good waterproof scrunchie to keep my freakin’ snapback on my head while I’m surfing. I’m really addicted to wearing a ball cap when I surf now. Helps me ignore the wave snakin’ wankers.

So, I usually pull my hair back in a ponytail and though the cap’s back hole. I like the newer silicone hair ties since they stand up to saltwater for far longer, but they absolutely tear my hair out when I get out from surfing. Enter the brilliant scrunchie.

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These things usually rip my hair out

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Scrunchie makin stuff 

I got out the remainder of the rash guard I used for another project, and cut a 4 inch wide strip from the waist area of the former rashie. I didn’t cut the side seams.

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Using a rotary cutter helps

Keeping it as a continuous loop, I pinned the edges together, lining up the seams on each side with the pink elastic encased.

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Going around the silicone band- this takes a while

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Another scrunchie I made from custom printed  fabric

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All pinned up

I could have whipstitched these edges together, but I serged them instead. I went VERY slowly around the piece, making the Lycra as straight as possible for the machine without overstretching it.

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I went super slow

Done!

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It’s the 80’s Way

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Went nuts making some

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Doesn’t come off as a scrunchie 

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Hurricane Hair

So the silicone band inside should last a lot longer than the traditional ones that seem to break on me CONSTANTLY (what a waste.) Plus, this is a perfect way to recycle gnarled Lycra from a rashguard.

Worked super well during this evening’s surf session. I never lost my hat, and that makes me happy. Bonus that it doesn’t rip my hair out after I get out.

While I don’t judge here at Crafty Surf, if you’re a surfer dude considering the Man Bun option, please consider this image first:

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Man Buns will make you a Conehead

Surfboard Fin Fun: DIY Roundup

I’ve done several DIY’s and crafts related to img_0857fins, so I wanted to round up a few fun posts to share during this April’s fin madness here at Crafty Surf. I just can’t handle the craziness.

Cheap DIY Fin Covers

I still use these craft foam covers- they’re better than the plain black ones they usually come with, and labeling them yourself just keeps things organized. For the surfer with a hint o’ engineer quirkiness.

Surfboard Contact Info

This is a handy hack using the single fin box to put some stealthy contact info if your board is ever stolen. Happens often around here, unfortunately.

Single Fin Thumbscrew

Great item to have if you’d like to get rid of a screwdriver in your surf gear. Check out the link to see the specs on what you’ll need.

Recycled Neoprene Surf Fin Sock

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In this project, I needed to make a soft cover for the glassed in fin on my wall hanger surfboard. An old wetsuit was perfect. After a good washing, of course.

Lovin’ The Nubbin

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I had a good time with this project. I took a plastic fin and mowed it down with the scroll saw. Then I attempted to sand some semblance of a foil into it. Silly and crazy, and mega fun to surf with. Fools have the most fun, right?

***

It’s been mucho fun learning about fins, and since new fins and fads keep popping up all the time, I know there’s more to see and learn.

I’m still upset at myself for letting my holy grail fin get away. I wanted this one for the uplifting art alone, since it speaks to my soul on so many levels….

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The Shaka and Beer. Like the Old Man and The Sea, they are forever entwined 

 

Surfboard Fin Fun: Hack Attack

Here’s a little hack attack to save some cash on what I consider to be a VERY handy item for single fins and longboards.

A typical single fin screw requires a flathead screwdriver or Phillips head to get out. What a pain in the ass.

Some time ago, a fin company carried a special “longboard fin screw” that was a thumbscrew, so you didn’t need the screwdriver. Also, you could move the fin in the box on the fly. Nice.

Problem was, they wanted $12 PER SCREW and NUT set. REALLY???? Screw you.

I’ve got a simple cure for that- buy it directly from a hardware store. I order what’s called a 316 Stainless Steel Thumbscrew. Stainless Steel is important for it to hold up in saltwater, yo:

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Get the good stuff for saltwater

Here is a new one in 316 Stainless, next to another one that’s been surfed for about 8 months on the regular:

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Not significant amount of rusting for so much use

I’ve found that the 8/32 thread size fits most single fin box  nuts that usually come with the fin, or also the surfboard itself. I only get the 3/4″ length to fit the depth of most single fin boxes.

 

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Shareable Size

Here’s a link to the place where I got mine:

McMaster-Carr (I don’t get anything for this, it’s just a link to the page)

Remember how I said I wanted to move my fin to the back of the fin box? I used the nut I already had that was in the box, but I can just switch to this type of screw:

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Moving the fin to the back of the box

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No screwdrivers!

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Ready to go and secure

That’s it, Bro-licious. And they’re FIVE screws (no nuts included) for $6.50, plus shipping. Mark ’em up and sell them to your friends, or give them away and score some surf cred. They’re super mega handy, believe me.

And if you’re going to bitch about the thumbscrew affecting the flow of water over the foil of the fin, thus creating vortices of instability, well, “bless your heart.”

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All. Da. Time.

Beach Hat Hack Attack

One of my best friends has finally gotten me into wearing hats when I’m on the beach and when I surf. I’ve had skin cancer twice, once on my face, once on my ear. When I had it removed on my face, they sent me to a plastic surgeon. I remember seeing all the pics on the waiting room wall of various women with cartoon boobs. And after my surgery, I would constantly get emails about “enhancements” available. Yikes.

Guess they know nothing about surfers. Every scrape, bruise, stitch and staple goes up on Instagram, and scars are worn with pride. “Leave that scar! I’VE got a story to tell!”

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My stylin’ hat

Whateves. Alls I know is that any surgery hurts, it’s freakin’ expensive, and it always seems to keep me out of the water during a fun swell. So, got myself a nice beachy straw hat to match my Jams that I don’t want to get crushed like my other unfortunate hats.

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Yep, this is what happened to my other beachy hats

So, I grabbed a plastic pants hanger from the closet (like you can pick up at any Big Box store), shoved the clips closer together, and used BOTH clips to hang the hat. This will reduce the stress of hanging it up by one point only, AND the belt hook even holds a couple of hair ties that I constantly seem to need. Bonus.

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Hangs nicely on the peg in the garage

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I think the Shakers hung up their surf gear like this…’Tis A Gift To Be Simple..

Gotta watch out not to get tan anymore, especially as I’m getting older. I’ll be sporting a hat, rash guard and leggings to surf I guess….no tan lines.

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Now that FB is dead, will tan lines come back in fashion?!?

Gnar Pro Wetsuit Wash DIY

We’re starting to get an early Spring here in Central Florida with temps up into the 80’s. We may get La Niña patterns-a-comin’ soon (means worse hurricanes for us in the Atlantic), but it’s WARM.

And that makes my inner Chris Farley dance like the El Niño king.

I would wear this

So in celebration, I decided to come up with an end of season wetsuit cleaning routine and try it on the ripest suit I could find….

There’s a lot of Neoprene here

This suit was given to me by a kind friend for scrap material, BUT, it’s 10 years old! Sorry, but before I would even touch it with a 10 foot pole for a project, it needs a DEEP clean. Bleach is the best option, but the chemicals in traditional bleach are harmful in so many ways, especially to the environment. Also, cleaning sports gear with regular detergent is a no-no if you want to make it last and avoid breaking down the material.

I’ve read that Oxygen Bleach is a good alternative to regular bleach in many cases, and can be easy enough to make yourself. The key ingredient is hydrogen peroxide, usually added to a carbonate. For this, I’m using Washing Soda, which is more effective than Baking Soda in this combo. Washing Soda can be found in the laundry aisle too, along with standard detergents. Just keep ’em separated, and they’ll last ya a while. Hint: you can use these for other things, not just wetsuits.

You don’t need much

Procedure:

This required my trusty 5 gallon utility bucket, cleaned and ready for use- outside. Although many instructions will say oxygen bleach will work in all temperatures, adding a bit of hot water doesn’t hurt to help along the reaction, which is a slow chemical process.

I began by filling the clean bucket partially with hot (or not) water. Now I was ready to start adding the ingredients, measured for use with approximately 3-4 gallons of water. Do not use more- a dab a’ do ya, brah, don’t over chemical things, man.

Wetsuit Wash (Dilute in 3-4 gallons of water, mix well):

  • 1 teaspoon Washing Soda
  • 1 teaspoon Hydrogen Peroxide (most stores only sell 3% to 5%, that’s all you need)

To stir, use a stick or handle, not your hands- it is bleach, yo. I used a broom handle. Allow the mixture to react for about 5 minutes BEFORE putting the suit in- the solution will get a little milky colored like mine did.

Make sure you stir the mixture for a few minutes before anything goes in

I put the suit in (with the broom handle since it’s grody), stirred it around, dunked it with it stick, and then let the suit sit in the mixture 24 hours, stirring it a few more times at the beginning of the process. Be sure to cover it if you leave it outside- I put a lid on mine to prevent any animals from drinking from it since I left it overnight.

 

The reaction is fully completed after 12 hours or so, so the mixture is inactive, and can be tossed out safely. Yay.

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I made sure to rinse the suit REALLY WELL afterwards- this is important! You don’t want any white powdery crud to remain on the suit.

BUT…if your suit is x-tra freakin nasty…..

Fill your rinse bucket back up with clean water, and add a few drops of pure Pine Oil. Pine Oil is a very effective disinfectant, and only a few drops are needed to make a quick rinse dip for your suit. Be sure to rinse it once more afterwards.

I hung the suit up on my HangAir dryer in my garage to dry, and it smells so much better and fresher. The inner lining didn’t lose any color either.

Smellin’ PHRESH 

So no, I can’t bottle this up and sell it, but if I did, I’d totally name it Mr. Belvedere’s Gnar Pro Wetsuit Wash. “Gnar Pro” gives it the surfer cred, but “Mr. Belvedere” makes it classy to be clean, yo.

It’s all about the marketing.

It’s sorta effective 

What do you think Mr. Wonderful???

This Old Rashguard….

It’s always good to fix or reuse whatcha got already, instead of always going for new, shiny stuff. This is especially true with clothing, which actually takes up a big percentage of our waste these days.

I avoid using the dryer as much as possible to extend the life of my boardshorts and swim gear (just look in the lint trap to see all the fibers you lose every time with your clothes). I’ve started to discover recently that it’s worth reusing and resewing some of my surf gear because the prices have become crazy for material and for the finished garments themselves.

Remember in my last blog post when I used a too small rashguard for a project? Here’s what I did with the rest of it.

This is what the original too-small rashguard looked like:

After my last project, I was left with a sleeveless top with a collar that I removed with the seam attached:

Next, I wanted to trim the length of the top so the finished garment ended up around my ribs (with a 2″ elastic band). I don’t need it riding up on me, and I’m not going for skimpy. I cut across about 4″ down from the armpit:

I also wanted to make the neck a bit shallower and matching front and back, so I used a French Curve to make a slight scoop:

At this point, you may want to line the front of the top with some of the extra rashguard material, especially if you are using a lighter colored rashguard, or if the material is really thin. I didn’t bother lining this one.

Next, I cut the collar into halves. This creates a little tunnel I can feed cord through, and the seam keeps it shut.

I pinned each of these halves onto the front and back of the neck, and serged them on.

So next, I measured out some 2″ soft waistband elastic. The rule of thumb for elastic is, take your measurement (an inch or two below my bustline for this), then subtract 10%. However, since I’ll be surfing in this, I’m going to take 15%, just because saltwater breaks down elastic quickly. Boo.

I serged the ends of the elastic into a loop, pinned the band onto the bottom, and strrrrrretched the elastic as I serged it to the bottom of the top.

To make the loop strap around the shoulder, I cut a 2″ strip from the leftover rashguard material. I pulled the strip taut to make it curl onto itself to make a cord so I could feed it through the channels at the neckline:

I sewed the cord loop closed when I got the length where I wanted it. Remember that it will stretch a bit over time. I like the long length, since I wipeout a lot, adjusting my top is a PITA.

Here it is, front and back. This dress form is a little small, but you get the idea:

No, I’m not going to model it personally and post photos. I’m a modest Southern lady that enjoyed fried foods for some years now, unlike my healthy quinoa friends.

Don’t judge me.

My Favorite Disney Princess….

Easy Wetsuit Hack Attack

It has been cold for Central Florida, with our water temps dipping down into the high 50’s. At least today was warm, but it won’t be for long. I may have to break down and buy another full wetsuit that goes all the way down to my ankles, and that makes me sad. Worse yet, I’ve got to go try some on, and it’s a pain in the ass to wriggle into the freakin’ wetsuits.

Most surfers have heard the old trick about slipping into a wetsuit easier (dry or wet) by using a plastic shopping bag over the foot or hand, sliding the appendage through, then removing the bag. There’s even surfy gimmicks out there you can buy to help you like the Jimmy or WetSox, but you can make this so easily, it’s insanity.

This upcycling hack looks similar to WetSox. I’m taking an old rash guard of mine that’s a teensy too small, cutting a sleeve off, sewing up one end with a whipstitch, and BOOM! E-Z Wetsuit Slip On Tool. Here’s my process in pics (I wish WordPress would let me do captions again):

A little more permanent than a plastic bag, plus it’s washable. Schweet.

So what am I going to do with a sleeveless rashguard? I might come up with another project, or I may go surfin’ with this brah, he knows the feeling of a good wipeout…