Surfboard Bag Rehab

While we were sifting around the junk in the garage last week, I noticed an old longboard travel bag that I won at a surf event several years ago. I’ve loaned it out many times to my friends who go on trips, so the bag is more surf-travelled than I am.

Might still have some life yet

The zipper pull is stuck and crusted from salt, and the plastic zipper teeth themselves have started to deteriorate.

It’s stuck

That’s just nasty

It’s not currently usable with the zipper almost completely disintegrated, so it had to be removed.

Seam ripper- this was a good section

Taking out the zipper took a while!

Unfortunately, a replacement zipper must be at least 10 feet long for this particular bag, and I cannot sew it in with my home sewing machine. Nor would I want to.

Enter Industrial Velcro. You can pick it up at most big box stores or hardware stores for less than 10 bucks for 10 feet. I used titanium scissors to cut 2 inch strips of the soft loopy side of the Velcro first to put on the sides of the board bag.

Just cutting the soft loopy side of the Velcro- keep the adhesive backing on

I placed one of these squares around the sides about every ten inches or so

I needed to put additional E6000 glue under the adhesive Velcro since Florida’s so freakin’ hot that I thought the Velcro adhesive would melt. I was right.

Next, I made straps for the top cover of the bag by cutting 8″ strips of 2″ wide webbed nylon strapping, turning one edge under and gluing it with E6000. This makes a sturdy edge to pull on.

My supplies

I turned the bottom of the strap up about an inch and glued it, holding it in place with clips

I cut 2” squares of the hook side of the Velcro to go on the underside of the straps

The straps glued up and drying

Once the straps were dried and the loopy patches on the board bag were dry, I was ready to affix the straps to the cover. At this point, I put one of my surfboards in the bag to fill it out properly for correct strap placement.

Once again, I used plenty of E6000 glue…

If it goes out to the edge, all the better

Glad textbooks are still good for something

I had to take everything indoors to allow the glue to cure properly since it’s a million degrees outside. I just made sure to keep everything ventilated. I also allowed everything to dry for over 24 hours since the bag will be taking a lot of stress.

Done!

Peels right open like a banana

Good enough for a trip up the street

Although this bag may not be suitable for plane travel anymore, it’s good enough for local travel. This may help keep some of the nasty sand, salt, and wax off of the roof of my car as a bonus. Since the cover just peels off and peels back on easily enough to load it in and out of the bag, it may actually get used now.

Hey, I’m might be a hick, but even I don’t want my little car to get THIS bad….

Hillbilly Surf Shop sounds like they know me well

Surfboard Fin System Blues

I’ve never been a huge fan of the current surfboard fin systems available.

Everyone’s got a favorite

To the uninitiated, there are basically two big players in the “fin system” market currently: FCS and Futures. They are the iPhone and Android of the Surfboard Fin World, and have superfans who are just as rabid. Once you pick a fin system to go into your board, you’re stuck with fins made for that system. It’s like only shopping at Google Play for eternity. Great.

 

FCS has upgraded their systems recently to allow you to snap in your fin without needing the tiny screws anymore. Supposedly.

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Lost one of my special FCS II compatible quad fins that way during a surf, so now I’m back to the tiny freakin’ screws set into the old crappy plastic box. And these other quads STILL back out on me, causing the fin to begin to lift out of the box. I discovered this happening again the other day:

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This keeps on happening

It’s absolutely absurd to pay this much money for screws that back out, systems that don’t latch, plus the cost of lost fins, which get hella pricey. No wonder FCS has a whole page dedicated to replacement FCS fins. Hmmmm….it’s not because yer a gnar shredda, brah.

Once again, I went back to the online hardware store to find some screws- some call them “grub” screws- a bit longer than the others made of quality 316 stainless steel that are MUCH cheaper than what FCS and Futures sells these for in surf shops.

Link to the screws I bought online here– I don’t get anything for this, it’s just info.

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The ones I ordered are da best since they’re not marked up 1000%

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Share with ya friends, wanker

These still sit flush when screwed in, and maybe they might have a better chance of staying in. And now when I lose one, it won’t cost a fortune. I have some boards that use Futures Fins, which only require one screw, but it’s the same length as the one I ordered, but I believe these are better quality for approximately 10 cents each. Sooooo much cheaper.

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Doesn’t stick out

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I replaced all eight

I really wish these companies would step up their game since they seem to be monopolies in the surfing world, much like Clark Foam was years ago.

The Surf Industry is just like any other industry, though….

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And people take me to the cleaners daily

Upcycled Surf Scrunchie

Yes, I’m guilty of STILL liking the idea of scrunchies. Fortunately, it’s a trend right now. Good- I could really use a good waterproof scrunchie to keep my freakin’ snapback on my head while I’m surfing. I’m really addicted to wearing a ball cap when I surf now. Helps me ignore the wave snakin’ wankers.

So, I usually pull my hair back in a ponytail and though the cap’s back hole. I like the newer silicone hair ties since they stand up to saltwater for far longer, but they absolutely tear my hair out when I get out from surfing. Enter the brilliant scrunchie.

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These things usually rip my hair out

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Scrunchie makin stuff 

I got out the remainder of the rash guard I used for another project, and cut a 4 inch wide strip from the waist area of the former rashie. I didn’t cut the side seams.

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Using a rotary cutter helps

Keeping it as a continuous loop, I pinned the edges together, lining up the seams on each side with the pink elastic encased.

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Going around the silicone band- this takes a while

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Another scrunchie I made from custom printed  fabric

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All pinned up

I could have whipstitched these edges together, but I serged them instead. I went VERY slowly around the piece, making the Lycra as straight as possible for the machine without overstretching it.

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I went super slow

Done!

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It’s the 80’s Way

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Went nuts making some

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Doesn’t come off as a scrunchie 

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Hurricane Hair

So the silicone band inside should last a lot longer than the traditional ones that seem to break on me CONSTANTLY (what a waste.) Plus, this is a perfect way to recycle gnarled Lycra from a rashguard.

Worked super well during this evening’s surf session. I never lost my hat, and that makes me happy. Bonus that it doesn’t rip my hair out after I get out.

While I don’t judge here at Crafty Surf, if you’re a surfer dude considering the Man Bun option, please consider this image first:

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Man Buns will make you a Conehead