Upcycled Surf Scrunchie

Yes, I’m guilty of STILL liking the idea of scrunchies. Fortunately, it’s a trend right now. Good- I could really use a good waterproof scrunchie to keep my freakin’ snapback on my head while I’m surfing. I’m really addicted to wearing a ball cap when I surf now. Helps me ignore the wave snakin’ wankers.

So, I usually pull my hair back in a ponytail and though the cap’s back hole. I like the newer silicone hair ties since they stand up to saltwater for far longer, but they absolutely tear my hair out when I get out from surfing. Enter the brilliant scrunchie.

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These things usually rip my hair out

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Scrunchie makin stuff 

I got out the remainder of the rash guard I used for another project, and cut a 4 inch wide strip from the waist area of the former rashie. I didn’t cut the side seams.

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Using a rotary cutter helps

Keeping it as a continuous loop, I pinned the edges together, lining up the seams on each side with the pink elastic encased.

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Going around the silicone band- this takes a while

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Another scrunchie I made from custom printed  fabric

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All pinned up

I could have whipstitched these edges together, but I serged them instead. I went VERY slowly around the piece, making the Lycra as straight as possible for the machine without overstretching it.

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I went super slow

Done!

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It’s the 80’s Way

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Went nuts making some

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Doesn’t come off as a scrunchie 

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Hurricane Hair

So the silicone band inside should last a lot longer than the traditional ones that seem to break on me CONSTANTLY (what a waste.) Plus, this is a perfect way to recycle gnarled Lycra from a rashguard.

Worked super well during this evening’s surf session. I never lost my hat, and that makes me happy. Bonus that it doesn’t rip my hair out after I get out.

While I don’t judge here at Crafty Surf, if you’re a surfer dude considering the Man Bun option, please consider this image first:

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Man Buns will make you a Conehead

Surf Leggings with Custom Digital Photo Print

If you checked out my last post, I had purchased a yard of sport Lycra from spoonflower.com with a digital photo I took and uploaded. The fabric came out great, and I was pleased with the quality and weight. For my project, I decided to make some simple, comfortable leggings I could surf in. I used a pattern I picked up in a clearance bin at WallyWorld:


The only drawback was that the fabric was printed on white Lycra, so with a dark print like I had, some white may show through on the seam lines. To minimize this, and to prevent distortion of the photo, I went with the largest size on the pattern- just in case. But, because I only had a yard, I cut the pants short into capris by cutting on the lengthen/shorten line (hehe!).

Hey, as good a line as any!

I cut one for each leg

This pattern was nice because of the minimal seams. One seam on the inner leg, and a seam up the crotch. Schweet.

This needle worked well

Simple zig zag stitch to allow for stretch

Using a walking foot on my machine helped

Inside seams finished

Bagging one leg into the other and clipping to sew up the crotch

There’s no need to finish off the seams since Lycra doesn’t fray out, but I did serge the seams with a two thread overlock to reduce bulk.

Next, I made the waist casing by folding down the top 2 inches and clipping around. I used 1 1/2″ non-roll elastic, leaving a scant seam allowance around the bottom. I also made a little Lycra hanging loop for the inside back of the pant to let it drip dry if I want.

Makin’ the waistband casing

To make the hems on the legs, I used a twin needle to fake a cover stitch. These work great on Lycra, and look awesome on hems.

These are da bomb

Use a long straight stitch with your double needle

Love the look of a double needle

Done!!!

So I was happy I went with the Medium size, because I didn’t want to overextend the Lycra. Yikes.

These held up well

Water cam!!!

Here’s some surf legging action shots by Ted Schultz from last Thursday:


Next time, I think I’m going to try this:

I can do that face. Totally.

Trying Out Spoonflower.com Fabric for Surfing 

It’s amazing all the various crap you can put a digital image onto now. And for fairly cheap. It used to be limited to posters, cards, keychains, and mugs at your Office Depot. Now, pretty much anything with a surface can be etched or covered with a digital image, and you don’t need to pay for a run of 5000 units to get a custom one made.

Spoonflower is yet another company in a growing market that specializes in using digital photographs to create customized fabric prints. This isn’t an endorsement, just a review of my own thoughts about the trend and their fabric, so it’s just info for ya. Yep, I paid for the stuff myself. Boo.



Love this, my 6’8″ Neilson Blue Hawaii Elvis

I’m really interested in this type of service, since fabric inlays are done all the time on custom surfboards. In fact, I have some Elvis fabric (purchased at Graceland- the Holy Zone- many years ago) glassed into a 6’8″ Neilson. Wouldn’t it be cool to pretend I’m a real photographer and have MY wicked awesome pic glassed into my next surfboard?? Neato. In fact, Swaylocks.com had some discussion on this topic a while back about printing on custom fabric for use in surfboard designs and art.

I wanted to try this digital fabric printing company out for myself. When I noticed they had not only a variety of cottons, but Lycra available to be printed on, that’s when I knew what I wanted my next surfy project to be.

I used this photo of some beautiful orchids from the Florida Keys my friends got me as a gift a while back. I wanted the Lycra to have a black background, so I did a dark vignette filter on the pic.

Original photo I took

Did the vignette filter on my iPhone, nothing fancy pants

The design upload and selection was pretty easy, and I sized the pic to be tiled onto 1 yard of fabric. One yard with shipping came out to around $35, so it wasn’t THAT cheap. But, relatively speaking, it’s not so outrageous compared with the cost of printed Lycra swimwear these days. I just hoped I wouldn’t mess up sewing, or this would get VERY expensive.

The yard came with a nice wide border around it

The fabric arrived in just a few days. I was happy with the heavy weight of the Sport Lycra. I did wash it twice in the laundry- on its’ own- to ensure no problem with color bleeding. I didn’t notice any fade after these initial washes.

Closeup of the tiled image

In my next post, check out what I made with my yard and if it held up to my style of surfing!

Bieber!!!! Shreddin’ gnar

Say It Like You Mean It…Woo Woo

I will admit I’m a total kook. I don’t surf well consistently, I don’t look before I take off, I wipe out in front of people, etc. I’m a general hazard in the water to all who dare enter it. Even the sharks worry about getting nicked by my fins (that why this worked so well).

To celebrate this fact, I decided to make my own supa cool surf cred t-shirt. I started imageout with a blank one that was a medium blue, not really light or dark. And I washed the heck out of it. On hot, with the towels, no fabric softener. I actually put it through three cycles before even starting my little project. These t-shirts always have sizing all over them, so it’s best to get rid of any of that before trying to iron anything on to the shirt.

I found some iron on printable sheets at the craft store, containing 5 iron on transfers for light fabrics, and 5 for dark. I wanted to experiment with this, so I decided to use the transfer for light fabrics just for fun. This means I will need to mirror flip my image once I complete my edits.

imageFor a background, I decided to use a collage I made years ago using collected surf stickers, wood, and paint. I used my Scanner Pro app on my iPad instead of taking a pic, because I thought it would make it a bit sharper, even bring out some of the texture better.

I brought the image into the scanner app, adjusted it a bit using the controls to make sure the logos were fairly distinct.

I also wanted to make sure the colors were pretty strong as well, knowing that I’m using a light fabric transfer.

Next, I imported the scan image into ANOTHER app called Over. This is a pretty neat imageprogram that has a lot of cool fonts you can superimpose over photos. I chose one that was kind of stencil-y looking and used a deep blue. I did fade the background just a touch to make the font stand out, but kept the strong colors.

Like a Rube Goldberg device, I finally brought the image into iPad’s Pages, resized  the image to 8 1/2″ by 11″ size, and flipped the image backwards. I then printed it out on my HP Envy, which is an InkJet printer. I knew I kept it around for something.

I put the shirt on a hard stable surface (my cutting table), with a small square of cotton fabric covered wood in-between the front and back layer of the shirt, then ironed on high the front where I was going to place the iron-on. After ironing for a few seconds, I laid the iron-on printed side down and quickly began to iron back and forth over the sheet pressing down hard, making sure I really got the corners. It takes a few minutes to get the iron-on hot enough to melt into the shirt. Just keep moving the iron, and press down HARD.

Don’t wait too long to peel off the backing- if you try to peel it cold, it will be a mess. I thought the light transfer had a neat-o effect on the blue shirt!

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I wanted to vintage up the shirt a bit, so I got out a little 220 grit sandpaper in the garage and scratched some of the sheen out of the iron on, then sanded up the seams a bit for X-tra cred.

Kookarific kiddos!

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