Surfboard Bag Rehab

While we were sifting around the junk in the garage last week, I noticed an old longboard travel bag that I won at a surf event several years ago. I’ve loaned it out many times to my friends who go on trips, so the bag is more surf-travelled than I am.

Might still have some life yet

The zipper pull is stuck and crusted from salt, and the plastic zipper teeth themselves have started to deteriorate.

It’s stuck

That’s just nasty

It’s not currently usable with the zipper almost completely disintegrated, so it had to be removed.

Seam ripper- this was a good section

Taking out the zipper took a while!

Unfortunately, a replacement zipper must be at least 10 feet long for this particular bag, and I cannot sew it in with my home sewing machine. Nor would I want to.

Enter Industrial Velcro. You can pick it up at most big box stores or hardware stores for less than 10 bucks for 10 feet. I used titanium scissors to cut 2 inch strips of the soft loopy side of the Velcro first to put on the sides of the board bag.

Just cutting the soft loopy side of the Velcro- keep the adhesive backing on

I placed one of these squares around the sides about every ten inches or so

I needed to put additional E6000 glue under the adhesive Velcro since Florida’s so freakin’ hot that I thought the Velcro adhesive would melt. I was right.

Next, I made straps for the top cover of the bag by cutting 8″ strips of 2″ wide webbed nylon strapping, turning one edge under and gluing it with E6000. This makes a sturdy edge to pull on.

My supplies

I turned the bottom of the strap up about an inch and glued it, holding it in place with clips

I cut 2” squares of the hook side of the Velcro to go on the underside of the straps

The straps glued up and drying

Once the straps were dried and the loopy patches on the board bag were dry, I was ready to affix the straps to the cover. At this point, I put one of my surfboards in the bag to fill it out properly for correct strap placement.

Once again, I used plenty of E6000 glue…

If it goes out to the edge, all the better

Glad textbooks are still good for something

I had to take everything indoors to allow the glue to cure properly since it’s a million degrees outside. I just made sure to keep everything ventilated. I also allowed everything to dry for over 24 hours since the bag will be taking a lot of stress.

Done!

Peels right open like a banana

Good enough for a trip up the street

Although this bag may not be suitable for plane travel anymore, it’s good enough for local travel. This may help keep some of the nasty sand, salt, and wax off of the roof of my car as a bonus. Since the cover just peels off and peels back on easily enough to load it in and out of the bag, it may actually get used now.

Hey, I’m might be a hick, but even I don’t want my little car to get THIS bad….

Hillbilly Surf Shop sounds like they know me well

Surf Leggings with Custom Digital Photo Print

If you checked out my last post, I had purchased a yard of sport Lycra from spoonflower.com with a digital photo I took and uploaded. The fabric came out great, and I was pleased with the quality and weight. For my project, I decided to make some simple, comfortable leggings I could surf in. I used a pattern I picked up in a clearance bin at WallyWorld:


The only drawback was that the fabric was printed on white Lycra, so with a dark print like I had, some white may show through on the seam lines. To minimize this, and to prevent distortion of the photo, I went with the largest size on the pattern- just in case. But, because I only had a yard, I cut the pants short into capris by cutting on the lengthen/shorten line (hehe!).

Hey, as good a line as any!

I cut one for each leg

This pattern was nice because of the minimal seams. One seam on the inner leg, and a seam up the crotch. Schweet.

This needle worked well

Simple zig zag stitch to allow for stretch

Using a walking foot on my machine helped

Inside seams finished

Bagging one leg into the other and clipping to sew up the crotch

There’s no need to finish off the seams since Lycra doesn’t fray out, but I did serge the seams with a two thread overlock to reduce bulk.

Next, I made the waist casing by folding down the top 2 inches and clipping around. I used 1 1/2″ non-roll elastic, leaving a scant seam allowance around the bottom. I also made a little Lycra hanging loop for the inside back of the pant to let it drip dry if I want.

Makin’ the waistband casing

To make the hems on the legs, I used a twin needle to fake a cover stitch. These work great on Lycra, and look awesome on hems.

These are da bomb

Use a long straight stitch with your double needle

Love the look of a double needle

Done!!!

So I was happy I went with the Medium size, because I didn’t want to overextend the Lycra. Yikes.

These held up well

Water cam!!!

Here’s some surf legging action shots by Ted Schultz from last Thursday:


Next time, I think I’m going to try this:

I can do that face. Totally.

Cheap DIY Fin Covers

Project Rewind again! Bringing more of the “best of” Blogger posts over to this new WordPress site. Thanks for your patience with me, and thanks to those checking out the posts. WordPress has been much easier to work with, and I’m looking forward to sharing more of my silly surf projects. 👍

I originally published this post on July 22, 2011 (sorry about the pic quality):

I have a bad habit of bumping my delicate, expensive, fiberglass or carbon fins into the wall, car, or some other standing or moving objects (sorry about the cat….) when putting my boards away, resulting in some repair work down the road. Some of my fins came with fin covers, some didn’t. Even the ones that came with the fin are ill-fitting and not really my style. To motivate me to use fin covers more, I decided to make some fun, bright, well fitting covers that will stay on the fin while driving, and will tell me which fin is which easily. This project takes less than 10 minutes on a machine- easy!!
I used foam sheets like they sell in the craft stores, usually in the kid’s crafts section. This project requires sewing, but you can sew them by hand if you don’t have a machine.
imageBasically, I found it was easiest to trace the outline of your fin directly onto a piece of foam with a pencil. Sorry about the quality of the pictures- the light wasn’t working with me today. Trace a line across the base of the fin, but don’t draw it longer than the fin that sticks above your board. That way, you can have the fin cover on while the fin’s in the board. This bottom straight line WILL NOT BE SEWN!!

imageI put another piece of foam underneath, and instead of using pins, I stapled the pieces together a good distance from the edge of the trace line. I stapled upside down so I wouldn’t scratch the heck out of my sewing machine plate as I sewed.

To sew this on a machine, I used regular polyester thread and a stitch length of 4.5. If you make the stitch length too small, the stitching line will create a perforation tear in the foam and you’ll have to start over. I also used a 70/0 universal needle. If you are hand sewing, use a standard embroidery needle with polyester thread and do backstitching (you can find a tutorial here), but have a light hand and space your stitches to avoid foam tearing.

For the machine, you’ll see I used a roller foot, which is a specialty foot, but a teflon foot works just as well on this foam.
I placed my trace line on the left inner edge of the foot and used this as a guide. This ensured that my stitch line was 1/4″ OUTSIDE the trace line- this ensures that the fin cover will come on and off easily. If your fin is supa-thick, use a wider margin.

 

Finished sewing!
After stitching the curved part of the fin cover together, I’m ready to start cutting out my cover. Foam doesn’t ravel, so I don’t need to overlock the edge, but you can if want, just know that the less perforation in the foam, the better.
Start cutting the shape out about 1/4″ outside the stitching line. Cut slowly, and try to keep a continuous cut going (don’t stop and start cutting) to make the edge smooth.
Once the curved edge is cut, I cut the bottom RIGHT ALONG the trace line I originally made. You should now have an opening for your fin!


Erase your trace lines, and that’s it! Put the cover on the fin to ensure a good fit, and that the bottom is not too long. This one came out great.

image
The fun thing is you can decorate the cover with Sharpies (SUPER art project for kids!), use contrasting colors for each side, paste foam shapes to the covers, label what imageboards they go with, or label the type and size. I labeled mine at the top for easy organization and color coded them.
The anal retentive surfer…… 🙂
Enjoy!!!