Eidon presents the 20th Sisters of the Sea Surf Classic

Each year, I like to go to an all women’s surf contest in Jacksonville, Florida. The Sisters of the Sea Surf Classic is an amateur surf contest to raise money for Breast Cancer Research, which is the philanthropic cause of the Sisters of the Sea of Jacksonville.

Trophy tent at Sisters of the Sea Classic

Surfboards being raffled off

And, they have NICE raffles. I freakin’ love raffles. It’s a horrible pleasure, but silly fun for a recovering statistics nut.

One of my best friends Karen (follow her on IG: @cbsurfkaren) went with me since she’s a GREAT photog, and this is always a big surf event, usually with over 150 women competitors, but lots of spectators, photographers, and gawkers.

Not so stoked about that, but I’ve got to “suck it up, Buttercup.” Outta that comfort zone, brah.

In surfing competitions, surfers will paddle out in groups of 4 or 5 at a time (called a heat), and attempt to catch as many (up to 10) quality waves within those 15 minutes. We had waves this Saturday, but they were on the smaller side and a bit closed out for me. I managed to catch my two wave minimum, but the far more talented ladies in my heat were catching wave after wave! I tried for a couple of more, but got caught in the rinse cycle. Oh well, I was gettin’ the exercise in, ya know….

Me tryna surf

I really love my new FunJun!

No more freakin pics….

So, I didn’t win a medal, but dead last in my heat. Boo. BUT, it was a fun beach day- encouraging women to take up surfing, and supporting the Women’s Center in Jacksonville. I think I’ll live knowing I didn’t “slay.” I’ll slay another day. Or whatever.

We had to leave early to head back home, but a friend of mine called Saturday evening to let me know I won something in the raffle. Booyeah.

Hey- need not be present to win, AND my dear friend brought it back for me.

Winner, winner, chicken dinner.

9’1” super light longboard. Schweet. I LOVE raffles.

The New Surfboard Bug

These days, I’m so happy with the boards I have, and I feel good about my collection currently. I could even trim it to this one only:

Starr 7’0” FunJun Quad + Single Fin

It’s my favorite all around board, but a while back, I had put a deep gash in it from ditching it under my friend’s board to avoid a worse collision on a wave. SO freakin glad neither of us were hurt, only the board. Big whoop.

This repair has been awesome

The repair’s been great, and I dig my paint job over the repair, but once I saw my local surf shop post a pic of this longboard with an acid splashed deck, I knew I wanted this look for the funshape I have now- much like a new dress, only slightly more resinous.

I love this acid splashed deck- I’m getting this with blue rails and bottom on my funshape

I will trade in the funshape I use now once my custom order is complete (hopefully soon!), so that will offset some of the cost, especially since this “look” requires extra paint on the rails and bottom (mine will be blue), gloss and polish on the resin. Honestly, this is not a need. However, hurricane season’s coming, and well, sometimes slipping into a new pair of shoes is nice to get you stoked.

Shoes are part of the Whole Game, Player.

Turtle Tracks Macrame Bracelet

Loggerhead Turtle

Here in Central Florida, it’s early sea turtle nesting season, so turtle tracks going up the beach can be seen in the mornings around the full moon. Turtles will lay their eggs in the sand towards the dune and cover them in sand. Then, they slip back into the ocean during the night, using the moonlight as a guide.

We are lucky to still have a few turtles left around here because our local conservation agencies do a fantastic job marking nests, so people won’t trample on them hopefully. Loggerhead turtles seem to be the most common off the coast of Brevard county, but I have seen a nice-sized rarer Kemp’s Ridley when I was out paddleboarding a few summers ago.

Check out the Sea Turtle Conservancy for info about sea turtles, and things you can do to help them to keep nesting for a little while longer.

Chaos happens when you leave lights on beachside

Like you could turn off your freakin’ condo lights if you live on the beach so it won’t confuse hatchlings navigating back into the ocean. The Condo Boogeyman’s not coming to take your pills, Grandpa- turn the damn balcony light off.

Anywho, since hatchlings should make tracks that go straight into the ocean, I made a fun Macrame bracelet using some basic knotting techniques that reminds me of a turtle egg and nice straight tracks. Check out the picture tutorial below, and use this knotting guide I made as a reference:

Macrame Knots Guide by Crafty Surf

Linhasita (or C-Lon cord) a flat cut cowrie shell, and some olivewood beads

Make a lark’s head knot though one side of the shell using about 2 yards of each color, folded in half

Use a T-Pin on foam or cork to keep your holding cord straight

Do 3 double half hitches across the green cord, doing 1 double half hitch on each color

Put a T-pin in and rotate the cord to the other direction and do the same knotting pattern, going back and forth

By using T-pins, I could keep the rows tight and straight across

Braiding the remainder, adding an olivewood bead, and making a secure knot. Now do the same on the other side of the shell!

Bringing both ends together to make a sliding adjustable knot

Making the adjustable knot by making a few square knots over both bracelet ends

Clip and melt the ends. Done!

This is always the “bracelet selfie” angle Pura Vida does

Please remember that sea turtles are not pets, Disney characters, and are not there for your fun-filled family entertainment. Please respect what tiny bit of space they have remaining.

This ain’t Disney, and you ain’t Snow White