Eidon presents the 20th Sisters of the Sea Surf Classic

Each year, I like to go to an all women’s surf contest in Jacksonville, Florida. The Sisters of the Sea Surf Classic is an amateur surf contest to raise money for Breast Cancer Research, which is the philanthropic cause of the Sisters of the Sea of Jacksonville.

Trophy tent at Sisters of the Sea Classic

Surfboards being raffled off

And, they have NICE raffles. I freakin’ love raffles. It’s a horrible pleasure, but silly fun for a recovering statistics nut.

One of my best friends Karen (follow her on IG: @cbsurfkaren) went with me since she’s a GREAT photog, and this is always a big surf event, usually with over 150 women competitors, but lots of spectators, photographers, and gawkers.

Not so stoked about that, but I’ve got to “suck it up, Buttercup.” Outta that comfort zone, brah.

In surfing competitions, surfers will paddle out in groups of 4 or 5 at a time (called a heat), and attempt to catch as many (up to 10) quality waves within those 15 minutes. We had waves this Saturday, but they were on the smaller side and a bit closed out for me. I managed to catch my two wave minimum, but the far more talented ladies in my heat were catching wave after wave! I tried for a couple of more, but got caught in the rinse cycle. Oh well, I was gettin’ the exercise in, ya know….

Me tryna surf

I really love my new FunJun!

No more freakin pics….

So, I didn’t win a medal, but dead last in my heat. Boo. BUT, it was a fun beach day- encouraging women to take up surfing, and supporting the Women’s Center in Jacksonville. I think I’ll live knowing I didn’t “slay.” I’ll slay another day. Or whatever.

We had to leave early to head back home, but a friend of mine called Saturday evening to let me know I won something in the raffle. Booyeah.

Hey- need not be present to win, AND my dear friend brought it back for me.

Winner, winner, chicken dinner.

9’1” super light longboard. Schweet. I LOVE raffles.

Tesla Made a Surfbort?!

I just read a story that claims that Tesla made a branded surfboard run of 200 boards that sold out within days, of course. Even at $1500, I’m not surprised. I AM shocked they didn’t charge $5000. It would’ve STILL sold out. I mean, people spend a quarter million on RV’s and those totally suck. Go figure.

Tesla’s latest zero-emission ride is a $1,500 surfboard

Take this out of your Surf Van

I don’t SEE an engine, though

If it doesn’t catch on fire, I don’t want it

If you want to read up on the gnar-gnar specs, check out Tesla’s shop listing HERE while it’s still up.

While I can certainly appreciate precision engineering in any technology, I would love to hear any actual surfing feedback from the 200 purchasers. These boards were designed by Matt Biolos of …Lost Surfboards fame, so they come with certified, stamped surf cred.

But, I’d bet all I would get from the owners is that it makes their office wall look “supa cool and phresh.”

Yikes.

Only da Best, Brah

Surfboard Fin Fun: History

I wanted to devote a few posts this April to surfboard fins. Sometimes fins may be called skegs, but it is an older term, usually reserved for longboards.

It took me several years of surfing to truly appreciate the difference in fin types. I’m forever learning, of course, but I’d like to share some things I’ve discovered along the way. I also really need to thank Core Surf Shop– they always put up with my endless questions about surfing and fins.

A little surfboard fin history…

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Tom Blake is DA MAN

Fins for surfboards were first added by one of the most brilliant surfing pioneers EVER, Tom Blake. The fin as we know it today was updated by Bob Simmons in the 1940’s. Simmons studied naval architecture to incorporate the fin into his surfboard designs, making the surfboard MUCH faster than its’ predecessors- even frightening some of the first surfers who tried them! The Surfing Handbook has a great rundown about the history of the fin.

Essentially, having a fin on a surfboard created a “rudder” on which the craft could pivot and turn. This allowed riders new freedoms in the emerging sport of surfing. As boards became smaller and lighter, board designers were creative with fins, essentially splitting the original single fin into two (keel fins), three (thruster), or four (quad).

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Single Fins are most popular on longboards

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Twin Fins can sometimes be called Keels, depending on the placement and shape

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VERY popular in the 1980’s with the shortboard craze

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This setup has become very popular trend

Central Florida’s sandy beach breaks and small waves year round (barring Hurricane season) are ideal for longboarding. Therefore, most of my personal collection of surfboard fins are mainly longboard fins, usually around 7″ or bigger.

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Part of my longboard fin collection

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One of my fins- this one measures 7.5 inches. Don’t include the part that rests inside the board when measuring a fin’s height

Next time, I’ll post about basic fin structure- it took me a LOT of time to figure out what the hell other surfers meant by all those crazy terms to describe a fin’s shape. It’s a science onto itself, and there’s some amateur surfers out there who focus SOLELY on fins like it’s their freakin’ job. Intense, brah.

I’m more like the naïve Little Mermaid of surfboard fins….but there’s worse things I could collect.

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Even mermaids are materialistic, sheesh