10 Tips on Buying Used Surfboards

Although I’m not a Pro, I have bought and sold A LOT of surfboards for an average surfer. I really don’t want to admit how many, but trust me, it would make Wilbur Kookmeyer jealous. (Check out THIS guy’s collection- I can’t hold a candle to it)

Oh, Wilbur! I know how you feel!

I’ve learned a few things, and had my share of victories and losses buying surfboards. Here’s a bit of insight from my experience, hopefully it helps other surfers have more successes buying and selling surfboards right off the bat. In this post, I’ll start off with tips for buying used boards.


*****


Tips for Buying Used Surfboards

1. BUY a surfboard for NOW, not LATER.

    Don’t let your surfy dreams get in the way of reality. That little used 5’10” Kelly Slater speed thruster may only be $150, but there’s a reason why. The guy selling it couldn’t ride it. You won’t be able to either, bro. Spend a little more on a used funshape, fish, or longboard, and you’ll be surfing a lot more, and getting more for your money. Then, if you want to progress to something shorter like that potato chip, you’ll probably be reselling the longboard, funshape, or fish anyway.


2. BUY a CLEAN used board.

    If a used board you’re looking at is covered in nasty wax and/or stickers, that should be a big red flag. If you can’t inspect for any dings, or repairs to past dings, just walk away. Open, unrepaired, or improperly repaired dings can create more damage later since water can seep into the surfboard foam.


3. BUY a used board WITH FINS.

    I hate it when a seller tries to short me at least a basic set of fins on a board, usually because they want to keep them. It’s a hassle to go hunting for fins to fit a “new” acquisition, and you better believe I will offer a lower price if a seller does this. The exception to this rule is if it is a vintage or antique collectible surfboard.


4. DON’T BUY a surfboard with more than 10% UNREPAIRED damage.

    Yes, you’re going to have to guesstimate this one, but I think you catch my drift. Repairs cost not only money, but time. When you buy a new-to-you board, the last thing you want to do is wait on getting your board fixed until you can ride it.


5. DON’T BUY a surfboard with more than 20% REPAIRED damage.

     Once again, this is an estimate, and the gauge I personally use. Like a car, I figure most of the value of the surfboard goes down once it leaves the surf shop. Because of this, I expect to get a good deal on a used board still in good shape overall, and that includes damage even if it’s been repaired. Repairs are still potentially weak spots in my opinion. I’ll pass on heavily repaired boards.


6. For new surfers, find a trusted local Surf Shop that sells used boards.

    In coastal areas with surfers, a lot of times, local surf shops will carry a selection of used boards on consignment. Yes, the surf shop gets a commission, but they can help steer you in a good direction to make a choice that won’t waste your money in the end.


7. For experienced surfers, use Craigslist (if you live in a safe area).

    Once you are familiar with what you are looking for in a surfboard, Craigslist is awesome. Generally, I find most surfboards listed under the category “Sporting Goods.” Here in Florida, I never limit my searches to coastal areas! In fact, some of the best deals I’ve gotten have been from inland areas like Orlando, or flat surf areas like Tampa. Sites likes eBay are better for Vintage and High End Collectible surfboards.


8. Consider trades.

    If you have a good sized surf community, consider trading a used surfboard you already have for another surfer’s used board. Sometimes, you can agree on an even trade, or a trade plus cash. Our Surf community has a few local Internet forums, which aid in trades with people you already know and surf with regularly.


9. ALWAYS pay in cash.

      If you don’t have the cash on hand, forget it. It’s impossible to negotiate with a credit card, even today. Checks are a hassle for a seller too, which will result in a halt to ANY potential reduction in price of the board for you.


10. Research what you’re looking for.

       Unless you’re completely new to surfing (seek out your local surf shop for help!), you should be able to do your own research before buying a used board. Find out what a similar NEW surfboard costs, and realize that most boards seem to lose 20% of their value (on average) as they walk out the door, even brand spankin’ new. Find out what standard board repairs cost. Compare prices on Craigslist, local Surf Forums, and at your local surf shops. That way, you can make fair offers that won’t cost you too much, but won’t totally offend the seller either. That’s good, since you may see them in the lineup in the future. Yikes.

Next post….Selling a Used Surfboard…

Yup.

      

      

    

DIY Surfboard Carrier Sling

I think these surfboard carriers are pretty smart, but they can also get a bit over the top. I just need something to take some pressure off of my

Kinda pricey, but nice

 carrying arm when I’m taking my board down to the beach. More so now with my recent shoulder injury. There’s some on online stores that are well-designed, could probably take a bullet, but also cost some real cash (plus S&H, too).

I just figured I’d make my own simple one out of an ancient bath towel, a couple of surf tees, and a bit of rubber kitchen drawer grip ($1 for a big roll from the thrift store originally). Kinda has that MacGyver feel. Nice.

I LOVE this shirt, but it’s a little big

I did this one mostly for my 7’0” funshape, so this not-too-big, not-too-small shrunken bath towel would work fine. This towel’s width was around 1/3 of the length of my funshape board, which I thought would help for stabilization.

The only machine stitching I did on this carrier was to make the top casings for the handles. I just folded down each end a bit to the outside of the carrier, pinned it, and ran a straight line of stitching down each end. Also hid the fancy pants brocade strip so common with bath towels. Takes away from the Surf Cred, ya know.

If you want, you can add the kitchen drawer grip as a strip to the bottom of your carrier, like I did. I made mine 6” wide, and around 26ish” long, approximately the width of the carrier sling. This will help the board from sliding out of the sling as you move around. I used a heavy hand-sewing needle and Button and Craft thread (thicker than sewing machine thread) to sew in the strip to the bottom.

Next, I applied interfacing to the back of the surf tee logo to give it some stiffness for use as a pocket. I sewed the cut out patch pocket onto the front of the carrier, being careful not to overlap the kitchen grip attached at the bottom. I used a triple step zig-zag stitch around the curved edge. The top edge was open, but I had hemmed it already.

Taking the remainder from the surf tees to make the handles for the carrier sling using t-shirt yarn (learn how to make t-shirt yarn), I braided the strands, then sewed two braids together to give it some width. The t-shirt knit makes it comfortable on the shoulder, too, and also stretches a lot.

The handles were made by feeding 1/2 of my doubled braid into the casing I made on the towel, and sewing the ends together. Same for the other side.
Done!

I’m in full GNAR mode now

I was pleasantly surprised that it will carry my biggest longboard, my 9’0” Dewey Weber:

Schweet

Now that’s how you MacGyver, kids.

Yikes. World’s over.

I Meant to Do That (Learning to Fall off of a Surfboard)

So I had another surf lesson this morning down in the Patrick Air Force Base area, since the waves were fun-sized for longboarding.

At least he went. Yikes.

 

Even though I’ve been surfing for quite a while now, I’ve only just recently been more careful about how I bail off my surfboard. I’m not too proud to learn the proper way to fall, because I’m certainly not getting any younger, and my punchcard at the Holmes Regional Trauma Center is full. So, today’s surf lesson at the slightly rocky, worm reef area of north Satellite Beach brought back a spoonful of reality.

That’s me (not from today). This ride was headed for a wipeout

I’ve become better at reading the wave, which helps, but I wish I had practiced falling off properly when I was first learning to surf. Better late than never.
My surf teacher suggested I look up skateboarding videos to help with surfing, since they are quite similar. And no, I won’t skateboard anymore (water is softer than concrete), but some of these videos are really good. I found one on YouTube that goes through falling off a skateboard properly, but he really explains how you should fall off safely in any action sport. I don’t personally know this guy, but it’s quite good:

How to Correctly Fall Off a Board (YouTube)

I will use the whitewater now as an opportunity to

Weeble Wobbles!

practice “tumbling” off of my board instead of just flying off backwards. This seems to cut down on the surfboard yanking back and hitting me, which is always a bonus, bro. Remember Weeble Wobble toys?? I figure if I stay low on the board, I can get knocked around like a 1 year old’s toy. For a hot second.

After being very mindful of falling off my surfboard correctly today, I composed a deep haiku, brah.

Paddle, paddle. Grunt.

Push-up. Twist, flail arms around.

CLOSEOUT! Tuck and Roll.



Always remembering the last surf session…..