DIY Upcycled Neoprene Pouch Keychain

This week has been cray cray. The stress of the holidays is approaching, and you can see it around Cocoa Beach with the influx of angry out of towners. And here I thought the ocean was supposed to be soothing.

Instead of getting out in the crazy shopping melee tomorrow, MAKE something useful out of your old wetsuit, since you’re probably getting a new one anyways. Even if you’ve been naughty and stealing my waves, you wanker.

I used a scrap of Neoprene from a machine washed wetsuit sleeve for the main part of this pouch. Machine washing is OK and DESIRED if it is to be used for crafting! The Velcro and nylon webbing piece came from another old surfing vest zip back. I cut the piece of Velcro in half so it would span the top flap and keep it closed.

I also used a keychain ring with a clip from the hardware store, and some heavy duty nylon thread in purple and black to sew everything. You can use Neoprene repair glue if you want to glue the pieces instead, but I hand sewed everything on.

I cut the sleeve just a few inches above the wrist, then cut away a little on the inside, leaving a top flap to put the Velcro on:

I sewed the clip and strap onto the back of the pouch also:

Done- and useful for putting all sorts of surfy stuff in, like surf wax, fin screws, leash loops, etc. Schweet.

Now, wasn’t that more fun than dealing with the holiday chaos?

The Latest Surfing Gimmicks and Fads

Like I’ve said before, I’m a total sucker for new little surfy inventions and fads. But, like anything, some are good, some are….interesting. I’m not a sponsored surfer by any means (still waiting to get sponsored by KFC so I can get my free biscuits), so these are just my random, average surfer insights. N-Joy.

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Dry Start Wetsuit System

Dry Start

Of course, this invention on Kickstarter is from San Diego- the land of chilly water. It’s a solution to dry your Wetsuit fast by using an attachment to the roof of your car. Then, I guess you drive like a maniac until your blow-out of your suit is complete. I can work with that. Also doubles as an impromptu body bag. Yikes.

Pros: Fastest way yet to dry a wetsuit and get out some road rage.

Cons: Bad news if the wetsuit bag flies off the roof of your car and finds a lawyers’ windshield.

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The Orange Peel Wax Container (Peel Surf Co.)

Peel Surf Co.


I’ve used silicone molds a lot for making my own wax, recycling wax, etc., so this is not a new idea. However, it’s a mold with a wax “break” line that fits into a car’s cup holder. Smart. Wax melts everywhere here in Florida, where it’s 90 degrees consistently every Summer day. But it’s microwaveable too, so you can whip up a batch of wax without a double boiler. Gnar.

Pros: Will save the inside of a surfmobile, might make you feel all crafty if you make your own wax

Cons: A little pricey at $12, but then, it’s kinda a specialty item. Good for Crafty Surfers- full disclosure: I totally backed this on Kickstarter since I love making wax. Just hope I don’t accidentally take a sip from this on a hot day.



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Fashion Color Wetsuits

Roxy, Billabong and XCel have reintroduced color back into neoprene again. This time, there’s less neon green and hot pink, and more modern colors and prints. However, sometimes I feel like I’m doing cosplay at the local Trekker convention in the current designs offered.

Pros: Some style in the water, bright Neoprene always improves the look of your surfing photos.

Cons: You may have to report to Captain Jean-Luc Picard, Number Two.



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Quiver Grip Surfboard Rack System

Quiver Grip

This was a new product I found out about recently, and the inventor is from Brevard County, Florida. This rack system uses plastic grips to corral your surfboards upright- like pulling a book from a shelf. It reminds me a bit of an IKEA solution to surfboard storage. It seems easy to install, and it’s cheap (less than $50 for a 3 board wall mount kit). Not crazy about the plastic beer-can holder look of the grips, though.

Pros: Like Huggable Hangers for your surfboards, inexpensive, easy to install and move around on the rail

Cons: Aesthetics of a frat house



Keep on trend, brah!

Ask Mr. Spicoli



3D Printed GoPro Wrist Mount

So this is my 3rd GoPro camera. Honestly, I’m not all that stoked on GoPro, but it takes passable pics in the water, and I like taking pictures for fun. Especially of my talented surfer friends. Me….not so much. Yikes.

I replaced my broken GoPro Hero 3 several months ago with the newer Hero Black Edition. It’s much smaller, lighter, and doesn’t require the pain in the ass housing.

However, the GoPro remote I had bought only a year ago had also given up the ghost. And I was NOT about to buy another remote, nor was I going to pay $50 bucks for a wrist strap mount that I knew wouldn’t be small enough for my wrist.

Luckily, we have a 3D printer, handy for printing out custom bits of plastic (PLA). But this plastic is made from corn, AND is compostable. Super gnar.

I put my “custom order” in with my husband, who drew up what I wanted for this project in

Funky green prototype

Creo Parametric, a digital drawing program. The file was exported for use in our MakerBot 3D Replicator. The original prototype- a custom-sized wrist mount with 1 1/2″ wide slots for a wrist band to pass through- was printed in low resolution (the surface was very grainy when completed, but it printed in less than a 1/2 hour). This prototype was made to check sizing and fit with the camera.
Once that checked out, a final version was printed in black using a much higher resolution. The underside of the mount was still very rough, due to how the item is printed. Since I had already intended to cover it with a scrap piece of wetsuit from a chest piece (where the rubbery grip is), it didn’t matter. The small piece of neoprene foam was going to be a cushion for my wrist. I used my quilt clips to make sure the glue made a good bond between the pieces.

The finished 3D printed mount

The unsanded underside of the mount to be covered with scrap neoprene foam

My scrap piece of rubber grip neoprene foam, the underside of the mount, and some glue

Clamping the scrap neoprene under the mount after placing the glue

Because I thought it would be EASY to find 1 1/2″ wide Velcro that would be suitable, I wanted the opening for the strap that wide. Also, the strap needed to be wide enough to prevent the camera from sliding around. But, alas, I had to make do by sewing two strips of 3/4″ Velcro side by side to make a wide strap since 1 1/2″ couldn’t be found readily. Good gravy.

This type is EXCELLENT for this purpose, and only costs a few bucks

Measured out the length I needed- make sure to flip the Velcro and re-sew it, or it won’t stick to itself!

Ready to try out for reals

The neoprene rubber inside keeps it from slipping


With the floaty on it

It turned out to be very comfortable to use, and I could easily paddle with it on. Here are some pictures from the other day using the wrist mount in the water.

Glad I got a few pics. The GoPro camera’s broken now, but the mount held up great. It was fun while it lasted.